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Alder Moon

It is a much debated, debunked and reproven  calendar system that may or may not have preceded the Julian variety in Celtic lands. The year is broken down into 13 months/moons each named after an indigenous tree, the first being Birch, symbolising new beginnings.
The forth moon is Alder (Fearn), symbolising balance and rebirth.
Of course depending on which calendar you follow this month will be Alder or March, and this new moon will be the third new moon (of 2020), the firth new moon (of the Ogham calendar) or the fifth moon (if following the year from the old pagan ways which Samahin/Samhuinn being the new year marker.)

Ash Moon ~ 18th March – 14th April

In Celtic mythology, the Alder (Fearn)  is all about balance; the balance of duality, masculine and feminine energy and principles. It is ruled by and grows near water (feminine) yet has strong links to war, particularly in Welsh Mythology concerning the Battle of the Trees (masculine). It bridges the worlds above and below. The rebirth and return of Spring is symbolised by Alder as well and both healing and protection, resurrection and transformation.

The correspondances associated with Alder are:

  • The deities Freya and Branwen as well as the Fae
  • The number 4
  • The colours pale green and true red
  • Rubies
  • The letters F and V
  • The planets Mars and Venus
  • Energy represented is Challenging
  • Animals : Hawk
  • Balanced in both the Feminine & Masculine
  • The Elements Water and Fire

What to do in the month (moonth) of Alder :

  • Gather the bark and leaves this month to make healing decoctions.
  • Work on banishing spells.
  • Spend time in the garden, tending to any plants (edible or decorative) for growing this season.
  • Perfect time to work personal magic focussing on divination, intuition and making deeply spiritual decisions and choices.
  • Make a whistle from the shoots of an Adler to cal upon the Air Spirits, or if you are so inclined, make a flute!
  • Make charms for Feary magic with Alder flowers and twigs
  • Create a stave or Ogham stick from an Alder twig
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Dawn of a New Future

This Spring Equinox sees us standing at the dawn of a new future. The season of rebirth, new beginnings, hope, optimism and enthusiasm after a long winter and latterly a very dark winter (looking at you coronavirus!). We have yet to reach “Peak Corona”, but already changes are evident. Positive change that shows just how delicate the balance is on our planet, between nature and human. Nature is reclaiming her rightful place.

Satellite imagery is showing massive patches of visible sky above areas previously densely blanketed in air pollution over China, Italy and parts of the US. In Venice there are swans and dolphins and fish in the canals which are clearer now than they have been in living memory. In a very short period of time, since we, the humans, have had to stop and change how we live, ie the plundering of the earth for resources to manufacture disposable stuff and commute using fossil fuels to work in industries to either manufacture or to earn money to buy said disposable stuffs, when we stop that, nature has the chance to restore the balance. I’m interested to see what happens post Coronafest, when Covid-19’s world tour has played its last venue. Will people and industry return to the ways of life B.C. (before coronavirus) or will we, the collective, finally sit up and realise that that life was not sustainable?

Mother Nature will continue to spin on her axis, pandemics will continue to happen as mankind pushes into the natural world for “growth” aka greed, releasing bacteria we can’t cope with, which needs to stay within its natural habitat. Wide spread forest fires, floods and freak weather systems become the new norm. New catastrophe following the last one. Lessons need to be learned but how many times? Because at the end of the day, we all live in Mother Nature’s house and the house always wins.

This is our chance to make the necessary changes, it’s not too late, infact the proof of the benefits of making changes is happening now. We can do more and we can do better. I don’t have answers as to all the hows, this is a complex beast we have created that now needs disassembling, but I have ideas and I know I’m not the only one.

Communities are pulling together, in every country, helping one another now. We are realising what we want versus what we need and are being forced to (re)view our priorities and values. I think it’s time government and big business start doing likewise. We are being shown the way , being given the opportunity to make the necessary changes. We are being challenged in this new dawn; which path to take? The challenge is ours should we choose to accept it.

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Spring Equinox

When do you decide Spring has sprung ?

Is it 1st March (by the Meteorological calendar) or Spring Equinox (by Astronomical calendar)? Or just when you feel the shift in the season and witness the trees budding and notice the light?

This year the Vernal/ Spring Equinox falls on Friday 20th March 2020  in the Northern Hemisphere (Autumnal Equinox for our wild ones in the Southern Hemisphere).  The actual time of the Equinox is 3.50am GMT.

The Equinox is a time of balance. We have 12 hours of day light and 12 hours of darkness a the sun rises due East and sets due West; equal amounts of light and dark before we head on towards the solstice, the light ever growing.

This is the period of fertility; animals, nature, ideas and projects. Imagery of rabbits, hares, chickens and eggs symbolising fertility. The rabbits and hares reputed for breeding and eggs, and chicks who lay eggs, represent the hatching of new life, birth (never wondered what bunnies and chicks had to do with Christ’s resurrection?). The period of rebirth and new beginnings, as Spring follows the symbolic death and hibernation of Winter. 

This season and festival celebrates the Maiden aspect of the Goddess. Ostara or Eostre in particular, who carried a basket of brightly coloured eggs and was accompanied by her pet hare. As they travelled they brought forth new life and regeneration to the land scattering her coloured eggs amongst the flowers in the meadows.

The Spring Equinox mirrors a women’s inner world in its Inner Spring season, where everything is new and fresh, preparing the fertile landscape, the pre-ovulation. It is also the waxing crescent moon phase. See how we are all connected ~ woman, nature, moon, our own inner cycles. All one.

The previous festival of Imbolg was embracing the last of Winter, and planning what was to come in the year ahead. This festival now calls upon us to put these plans into action. We got rid of the old and expired habits, practices and burdens and are now ready to give new life to who and what we are to be, to what we have created, to what we are to birth. The energy is one of excitement, optimism and anticipation. As the year waxes, so too does our enthusiasm.

Do you do anything special to acknowledge this Sabbat; the precursor to Easter?

Ways to celebrate Spring Equinox:

  • Rise early and watch the sunrise – then close the day witnessing the sunset. This is a beautiful ritual to do outside, weather permitting
  • Decorate your home with fresh flowers from your garden such as daffodils, primroses, hyacinths and tulips
  • Enjoy an eggy breakfast
  • Paint or decorate boiled eggs
  • Organise an egg hunt in the garden or local park with your decorated eggs – if it’s a nice day bring a picnic
  • Give a gift of a chocolate egg (instead of waiting until Easter)
  • Get into your Spring cleaning in earnest – throw the windows open wide and allow the old air to leave and the welcome in the fresh
  • Create a joyful happy play list on Spotify and get your groove on as you clean or make dinner. A kitchen disco is a great disco.
  • Charge some fresh water with Equinox energy by leaving a dish of water on the window sill from sunrise to sunset then use it to water your plants or make flower essence tincture.
  • Reset your altar or shrine to reflect the change in season.
  • Spend some time in meditation and contemplate balance, rebirth and what spring means to you.


While it’s not been a particularly cold winter here in the UK it has been a blustery and stormy one, and with the arrival of Coronavirus / Covid-19, and I for one am ready for Spring and all that she brings forth.

With blessings

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Ash

The third moon of the Ogham Celtic Calendar is Ash (Nuin), symbolising influence and light of the World Tree, which is where we now find ourselves.
Of course depending on which calendar you follow this month will be Ash or February, and this new moon will be the second new moon (of 2020), the third new moon (of the Ogham calendar) or the forth moon (if following the year from the old pagan ways which Samahin/Samhuinn being the new year marker.)

Ash Moon ~ 18th February – 17th March

In Celtic mythology, the Ash is also known as the tree of enchantment and transformation. It is also associated with healing, prophesy, divination and intuition.

The correspondances associated with Ash are:

The deities Minerva, Oestre, Frigg, Nemesis

The number 3

The colours pale blue and white

Turquoise and Lepidolite

The letter N

Healing energy

Animals : Unicorn

Balanced in both the Feminine & Masculine

The Elements of Fire and Water

What to do in the month (moonth) of Ash :

Make broom/besom – the handle is made from Ash wood

Use the tender tops of Ash leaves to make a detox tea to cleanse the liver and spleen and strengthen the immune system.

Deepen your Spring cleaning – get really thorough!

Consider your personal transformation of self or space, physically or spiritually

Spend time outside

Make a healing wand from an Ash branch/twig

Perfect time to work personal magic focussing on your inner self.

Place an Ash leaf under your pillow to induce prophetic dreams

Make a talisman or charm to keep about your person from a twig from an Ash tree to repel toxic people

Create a stave or Ogham stick from an Ash twig

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Rowan

Are you familiar with the Ogham Celtic Calendar? (Pronounced Oh-am) It is a much debated, debunked and reproven calendar system that may or may not have preceded the Julian variety in Celtic lands. The year is broken down into 13 months/moons each named after an indigenous tree, the first being Birch, symbolising new beginnings. The second moon is Rowan, symbolising the strengthening of your resolve and nurturing those dreams, which is where we now find ourselves.


Rowan Moon ~ 21st January – 17th February.

In Celtic mythology, the Rowan is also known as Mountain Ash or Witchwood and is the tree of wisdom and protection. It is also associated with personal power, dreams, vision, mystery, magic, tenacity, healing, astral travel, perseverance and transformation.The correspondances associated with Rowan are:

  • The Triple Goddess Brigid
  • The number 2
  • The colour white
  • Protection against unwanted spirits
  • Personal growth; tapping into your intuition to create your desired dreams
  • The pentacle – the bottom of each red berry takes the form of the pentacle
  • Peridot and smokey quartz
  • The letter L
  • Quickening energy
  • Flower : Snowdrop
  • Animals : Duck, Unicorn, Bear
  • Feminine
  • Dragons and Elves
  • The Elements of Earth and Fire
  • Unlucky to chop down a Rowan

What to do in the month (moonth) of Rowan :

  • Celebrate the cross quarter fire festival of Imbolc
  • Begin your Spring cleaning
  • Dedicate/ rededicate yourself or be initiated in to your chosen path, under a Rowan tree
  • Make a wish when you spot a snowdrop
  • Make your own butter and bake scones with the butter milk (and of course spread he butter on the warm scones with jam – rowan berry jam is delish!)
  • Enjoy the Rowan berry wine made from the berries in the previous Autumn
  • Make a talisman or charm to keep about your person from a twig from a Rowan Tree
  • Create a stave or Ogham stick from a Rowan twig
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Deep in the Womb of Winter

Deep in the womb of winter; this is where I find myself.

January, with its icy, howling wind blowing in a damp, raw air that chills me to the bone. The dark, heavy skies give an ominous air that draws me to surrender to its presence, while patiently I wait for snow. For when it snows, the air is milder, the energy lighter and the noise is muffled under the Cailleach’s cloak in a metaphorical coziness that invites both childlike fun outdoors and coorying in indoors.

In these dark days and weeks of winter, I relish the time to just be. I don’t bounce straight into New Year New Me; that’s just not my style. Instead, I light more candles and embrace the slow pace, the space and the very deliberate lack of routine, for as long as I can. A big fat pause on life to properly rest and reset. This year, more so than ever before, I feel the need to withdraw and sit in the stillness by myself. And for once, I’m listening and paying attention. I want no company, no distraction ( I see you and hear you social media and you know exactly how to draw me in! You are my WIP!), to be able to eat, sleep and walk in the woods as I please, no timescales, no expectation, just my simple rituals, pencil and fire (and soup!!). But of course, I live in the real 21st century world with a family, home and business, so while I can dream of this existence, the reality is more the taking of little bits of it at a time and make the ideal come true in the inbetween spaces of everyday living. Baby steps.

This is my time for planning and dreaming. My head is burlin’ with ideas and wants and desires for the coming year but none of them are yet in action or even anything other than a list on paper or swimming in my imagination. I have not the energy nor the strength to even attempt to put into action currently. Perish the thought!

We are approaching the first full moon of 2020 (7.21pm GMT Friday 10th January), also known as the Wolf Moon, Snow Moon, Cold Moon or Birch Moon, alongside the lunar eclipse. The energy is rising as the moon waxes to her full size and strength, yet for me, my cycle is in direct contrast. My energy is waning and am drawing inwards towards my dark moon phase, my inner winter. My mood and my energy perfectly in sync with the season and myself, with where I need to be.

How are you feeling this winter?

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What is Yule?

What is Yule? Are you familiar with the word but unsure of it’s meaning? Or know a bit about Yule but unsure as to how to celebrate the festival or of the meaning behind the celebration?

Yule is the time in the calendar also known as Winter Solstice or Midwinter. It is the pre-christian, pagan celebration of the return of the sun. The precursor to the modern day, christian celebration of Christmas. It was honoured and celebrated across much of northern Europe, particularly in Celtic, Scandinavian/Nordic and Germanic cultures (known as Jul).

Here in the northern hemisphere, this time of year is very dark with only a little sun light each day, but on the Solstice, the shortest day of the year, some places see no sun light at all. To get through these dark times, people came together to feast and make merry; to make offerings to the Great Mother (Mother Nature/Gaia/Goddess / local deities) and to honour the sun to ensure its return once more. With the sun’s rebirth comes lighter and warmer weather to farm, grow food and livestock thus enabling their very survival. The welcome and vital sunrise was celebrated as a festival as it was believed to truly be a miracle and people rejoiced that they had been blessed by the light once more. The festivities lasted many days and more recently have been referred to as the 12 days or nights of Yule/Yuletide which gave forth to the 12 days of Christmas.

Living in tune with nature, the cycles of the earth and seasons of the land, the people of the day were at the mercy of the weather and of the Great Mother and would ensure they pleased Her with their offerings, in both thanks for what they harvested and in hope for success for the next year coming. The best of the produce would be served at these revelries and the rest would have to keep families going throughout the winter, lest they starve until the new crops began to grow and the new animals were of an age for slaughter. Spring was a lean season for eating, but a good successful harvest secured a hearty and abundant winter and a pleased Mother.

As well as a time of celebration, Yule was also a time of peace and quiet contemplation of the lessons learned. Gratitude and joy was shared for the year just gone and hope was encouraged for the year to come. The festivities were steeped in observed rituals and reverence as well as helping lift the communities through the bleak midwinter lull in work and idle hands. Instead of working the land, evergreens were gathered and brought inside, the branches, boughs and trees or bushes (Christmas tress and garlands by today’s understanding) were adorned with candles, lit to to give encouragement to the vegetation to grow and thrive in the coming year, and remind the sun to grow bright and strong, as well as to keep any fae, housed in the boughs, warm during this cold dark time.

Many traditions from the ancient ways are still in practice today, some have been modified to accommodate modern living but the essence remains true. This is not a commercial festival, with the business of busyness, but rather a meaningful time to make like nature and find the stillness in the dark to turn inwards in contemplation of what has gone before; give thanks and release what no longer serves or has expired, to say farewell to those souls who have departed this earthly plane in the past solar cycle and to also create, plan and make space for what is to come in the following cycle. It’s cold outside so connecting with kith and kin hearthside, round the Yule log, sharing in communal ritual and togetherness, gift giving and feasting is as important today as it was way back when.

So how do modern day pagans celebrate this important time in our Wheel of the Year (calendar)?

I can’t speak for anyone else but thought I would give you an insight into what yule looks like rounds at mine. A quick pinterest search will open to millions of pins of ways people across the globe are honouring the sun’s return. In the Northern hemisphere, December 21st (approx) is Winter Solstice, but in the Southern hemisphere, it is Summer Solstice that parties with Christmas, while their Winter festival is in June.

Our Yuletide celebrations begin at sunset of the evening of December 20th, Mother’s Night (Modranecht ). I say “our” celebrations, but I really mean mine! I’m the only pagan in the house, but my family share in some of the celebrations with me which is beautiful and has become traditional in our own wee family. All work must be complete by this evening, there is no “work” during Yuletide. This night is not too dissimilar to Samhuinn in that it is time for me to acknowledge and honour the Mothers who have come before me, my motherline ancestral thread. I have names for these women now, but in years gone by I didn’t so my ritual was more a prayer/blessing to all Mothers, and Mother-like women I know, knew and respected. I like to take time for myself and dedicate this time to meditation and a small ritual involving naming my ancestors and giving thanks.

The day of Solstice or Yule will fall on 20th or 21st or 22nd December. This year our shortest day is 22nd and the light will be reborn at sunrise on 23rd. We have a special meal – ALWAYS Nigella’s Christmas Ham (her Christmas cook book is the only bible I ever owned – it comes out every year without fail since I bought it in 2008) eaten by candle light, we have a small gift exchange – the gift has to be crafted (usually food! Once again thanking the Goddess that is Nigella) or be a second hand purchase or books – books are the best gift in my opinion, and if second hand then even better, especially if they are old and have an inscription in the inside cover. My copy of Little Women that my husband gave me for yule about 10 years ago, has an inscription from Elsie to Alice in pencil from April 1911 – who were Elsie and Alice?? Anyways, I digress. We watch the sunset into the longest night of the year, exchange a small gift and give thanks for the year gone and make a wish for the year to come. It’s such a cozy evening with just the twinkly tree lights and candles. This year, weather depending we are hoping to get the fire going and can sit outside for a bit as the sun goes down and burn our wishes and a makeshift yule log (as well as enjoying the chocolate variety for pudding). In ancestral times, the fires were extinguished and hearths were cleaned out. The communal village Yule log was lit from a taper saved from the previous year’s log to continue the luck and good fortune into the new year, and then each household’s new fire was lit from a flame from the blazing communal log. The following morning I will witness the sunrise, as it returns in welcome to join it as we dance its next dance.

A traditional Scottish Blessing for Solstice’s returning sun :

I welcome you,

sun of the seasons,

as you travel the skies aloft;

your steps are strong

on the wing of the heavens,

you are the glorious

mother of the stars.

A modern twist on the rejoicing the light is when my son and I jump in the car (usually the evening of 22nd or 23rd) and drive round all the local villages and look at all the lights people have decorated their homes and garden with, and bring along hot chocolate for our nighttime road trip. Over the course of the next couple of days, including Christmas day, the time is spent with family and friends celebrating the season, eating and feasting and laughing and enjoying (and stressing and arguing and eye rolling but there is always mulled wine and/or rum!) which is tempered by quiet moments of time to myself each evening (sometimes, especially on 24th or the 4th night of Yuletide, that quiet time is literally 5 mins before bed!).

But it’s the betwixt days between Christmas and New Year that are my favourite; lots of time for contemplation, working out the kinks and plans for next year, eating leftovers and rich foods, sleeping and resting, not keeping any routine or “normal hours”, seeing friends, getting outside into nature and cleansing (redding) the house ready for 12th Night, Hogmanay. The festivities all leading up to “The Bells” and steak pie and the traditions that come with this night. I prefer to have the tree down and the decorations away before The Bells, so as to welcome the new year in fresh and clean but I know I am in the minority for that.

Some other ways to honour the 12 nights of Yuletide could be to spend each of the 12 nights reflecting on a month of the year just gone i.e. first night, what lessons did January hold, 2nd night for February so on and so forth. Welcoming the sunrise with yoga sun salutation. Baking and sharing sun bread. Having a potted tree or an evergreen tree in your garden that you can decorate with birdseed, nuts and berry garlands and icicles for our feathered friends. I’m sure you have plenty of ideas that suit your needs/beliefs/wishes.

I love Yule and actually would happily fore-go Christmas in favour of yule but that would take some explaining to the family and result in hurt feelings and misunderstandings that quite frankly just aren’t worth the hassle – who needs more stress in December? So I will continue to celebrate both and maybe my 9yo will develop my same love for a low key Yule over the extravagant Xmas as he grows up but for now he is still all about Santa and the excess of the season. To him it’s magical and when I was his age, it was pure magic for me too.

Solstice Blessings to you

Lissa xx

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12 Nights of Yuletide

On the first night of Yuletide Great Mother gave to me, my Motherline ancestry.

On the second night of Yuletide Great Mother gave to me, evergreen trees and my Motherline ancestry.

On the third night of Yuletide Great Mother gave to me, the returning sun, evergreen trees and my Motherline ancestry.

On the fourth night of Yuletide Great Mother gave to me a flaming log, the returning sun …

On the fifth night on Yuletide Great Mother gave to me, time with family …

On the sixth night of Yuletide Great Mother gave to me, feasting and laughter …

On the seventh night of Yuletide Great Mother gave to me, a bunch of mistletoe …

On the eighth night of Yuletide Great Mother gave to me, quiet contemplation …

On the ninth night of Yuletide Great Mother gave to me, sacred solitude …

On the tenth night of Yuletide Great Mother gave to me, cleansing energy …

On the eleventh night of Yuletide Great Mother gave to me, love in abundance …

On the twelveth night of Yuletide Great Mother gave to me, the turning of the wheel, love in abundance, cleansing energy, sacred solitude, quiet contemplation, a bunch of mistletoe, feasting and laughter, time with family, a flaming log, the returning sun, evergreen trees and my Motherline ancestry.

Sing along to the tune of the 12 Days of Christmas. These are the 12 nights that best suit and reflect MY yuletide – what would yours look like?

With love & blessings

Lissa xx

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Dear Winter

Every year I look forward to your dark embrace.

Your stark, barren chill brings a wild clarity where the shadow is invited into the light, hearth side.

As I await the Cailleach’s freshly laundered cloak of white to spread out across these lands, I quietly settle into slowing down and coorying in, into your season.

While I eagerly anticipate you annual arrival, I am well aware of the sense of dread your appearance brings to others. Those without shelter, food, comfort, their health or the love of kith or kin. You make their very existence a challenge for survival.

In contrast to the poverty lived by many, the polar opposite also bears witness to showcase wealth, abundance and for some, greed; much of which will lead to the aforementioned poverty in the spirit of keeping up appearances.

There is no hiding in your season, where everything is raw and exposed; branches bare and wind unforgiving. You are relentless in your pursuit of truth, forcing the pause of hibernation to turn inwards to seek our heart’s desire or assess our current situaion, for good or othewise; mentally and physically clearing the path of the old to make way for the new growth.

I crave the simplicity of life that you so beautifully demonstrate in the earth around me. Peaceful, resting, hibernating, going deep to renew once again in Spring. To appreciate what has gone before and to prepare for what is to come with a healthy dose of self care and preservation, feeding my body simple but nourishing foods and loving those around me hard.

Thank you for this time of quiet and slow reflection.

With love, blessings and gratitude

Lissa

xx

(Inspired to write this by Carrie-Anne Moss, of Annapurnaliving.com and her book Fierce Grace)

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Remembering Our Ancestors

October is my month, Autumn is my season; the season of the witch, of transformation, a transition period, of evolution, of turning inward. It’s dark and it’s energy contemplative, shadowy, truth seeking, quiet, nourishing and soulful. This is the time before the pause, I’m in my home and nesting, tending the hearth, coorying down prepping for hibernation; I look forward to this point of the year, each and every year – you can keep your spring and summer, I’ll keep my late autumn.

Late October is also, associated with Halloween or All Hallow’s Eve, followed by Hallowmas, All Hallows Day, All Saints Day on 1st November then All Souls Day on the 2nd. In times gone by, the whole affair was known in Celtic traditions as Samhain/Samhuinn. In time before the Gregorian or Julian calendars with set dates and days, the passage of time was measured by the solar and lunar cycles. Much simpler, much more intune with what was happening naturally. The rituals of this fire festival were respected and revered on and around the dark moon, and that wouldn’t necessarily have been 31st October (because 31st October didn’t exist). The darkest sky at this time of year was considered to the be the gateway into the winter months and the point where the veil between the worlds was at its thinnest, allowing our ancestors to move between their world and ours. Of course, that also meant that any malevolent spirits could also traverse the veil, hence the need to ward them off with charms such as skulls (evolving into the jack o’lantern of today).

Honouring our ancestors and deceased loved ones, whether by telling and retelling their stories, looking at photographs, visiting their graves or by some other means of remembrance, is a long held tradition of keeping their memory alive in the now and carrying forth into the future.

Why is that important? People only stay “alive” for as long as we remember them and continue to tell their stories. Our ancestors make us who we are – we here because of them, whether they be someone to honour and love or are ashamed or embarrassed by, what ever horrors they lived through or were involved in, whether they were “good people” but “of their time”, whether their beliefs and values mirrored ours or not, which ever path they walked, how they lived, loved and breathed, we are here today thanks to them.

Our ancestral DNA is imprinted in our very fabric of existence. What magic and memories are you holding at a cellular level? How do you weave their story into you yours? We create and tell our own stories, but what can we learn from the past for today and moving forward.

I ask you, do you know who your ancestors are? If so, how far back and from where do they hail? Do you know your Red Thread, who your female ancestors are? A beautiful way to honour your ancestry is to trace it, see where your lineage lies and from where. Embrace your roots and learn your heritage. You may end up surprised or it may lead to conversations with relatives you’ve lost contact with and sharing of yet more stories or old photos, with names and people and places.

And looking to the future, we are the ancestors of tomorrow; whats (y)our legacy?

This year, the dark moon is Sunday evening, 27th October (actual 0% lunar visibility falls at 03.38GMT on Monday 28th) so celebrating and honouring our loved ones and the festival this weekend is perfectly appropriate. Samhuinn, the 13th New Moon of this year and the Celtic New Year all rolled into one celebration. So get your pumpkin ( or tumshie as per my household preference) carved, prepare, serve and enjoy a favourite meal of your loved one no longer earth-side, dook for apples and divine the future. Make merry and have a blessed Samhuinn.

Love Lissa